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Wales and the Britons, 350-1064$
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T. M. Charles-Edwards

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780198217312

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217312.001.0001

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The Britons, the Northumbrians, and the Rise of Mercia, 550–685

The Britons, the Northumbrians, and the Rise of Mercia, 550–685

Chapter:
(p.381) 12 The Britons, the Northumbrians, and the Rise of Mercia, 550–685
Source:
Wales and the Britons, 350-1064
Author(s):

T. M. Charles-Edwards

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217312.003.0013

The first section of the chapter considers the origins of the English kingdom of Northumbria, a seventh‐century combination of Bernicia to the North and Deira to the south. Both Bernicia and Deira are British names; and these kingdoms emerged in a British context, probably had relatively large British populations compared with English kingdoms further south and east, and yet enjoyed major successes against English rivals. The second section discusses the borderland between Mercia and the Welsh, Northumbrian interventions in the area, its changing nature and the Welsh loss of what later became Shropshire. The third section discusses the role of the Church in the conflict between Britons and English and argues that the stigmatization of the Britons as heretics and schismatics may have played an important role in anglicization.

Keywords:   Northumbria, the northern Britons, Mercia, changing frontiers, Wilfrid, anglicization

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