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The Age of ConquestWales 1063-1415$
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R. R. Davies

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198208785

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208785.001.0001

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Native Wales, 1172–1240

Native Wales, 1172–1240

Chapter:
(p.216) Chapter 8 Native Wales, 1172–1240
Source:
The Age of Conquest
Author(s):

R. R. Davies

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208785.003.0010

By the 1170s, the area of Wales still subject to native rule had assumed the form that it was to retain for the most part until 1277. It covered well over half of the surface area of Wales, though in terms of population and wealth the proportion was very much smaller. The whole of north Wales, from the estuary of the Dee to that of the Dyfi and across to the Severn valley and beyond, lay within the district of native rule. Yet the political geography of native Wales had more fixity than the internal quarrels of its dynasties might suggest and more stability certainly than it had enjoyed in the eleventh and early twelfth centuries. As princes exploited the wealth and resources of their principalities more systematically, as ties of lineage and reward were forged with local nobility, so the geographical identity of each kingdom, particularly the greater kingdoms, became more firmly defined.

Keywords:   Wales, wealth, population, dynasties, princes, kingdoms, political geography, native rule

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