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Radio London and Resistance in Occupied EuropeBritish Political Warfare 1939-1943$
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Michael Stenton

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198208433

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208433.001.0001

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The Status Quo

The Status Quo

Chapter:
(p.242) (p.243) 21 The Status Quo
Source:
Radio London and Resistance in Occupied Europe
Author(s):

Michael Stenton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208433.003.0021

When Denmark was invaded by the Germans on 9 April 1940, the Danish government ordered armed resistance to cease. No state of war was declared. The Germans explained that they had come to forestall the British and had no intention to extinguish Danish sovereignty. The government continued to assert Danish neutrality despite the occupation, though ministers did not pretend that neutrality had not been violated. The occupation force was small and the Gestapo had only a small office of no immediate importance. The Social Democrats were the most stubbornly self-centered party in Denmark, but their general outlook was shared by other three large parties — they wanted Britain to survive and if possible to win, but they did not want to help. The Danish Army of six thousand men had their own plans for secret army activity.

Keywords:   Denmark, Germany, British, sovereignty, neutrality, Gestapo, Danish Army, Social Democrats

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