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Radio London and Resistance in Occupied EuropeBritish Political Warfare 1939-1943$
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Michael Stenton

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198208433

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208433.001.0001

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The First Gaullism

The First Gaullism

Chapter:
(p.134) 12 The First Gaullism
Source:
Radio London and Resistance in Occupied Europe
Author(s):

Michael Stenton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208433.003.0012

This chapter describes de Gaulle as a man with a strong personality. It describes him also as touchy and states that his manner was often stiff and arrogant; he made unnecessary mistakes of tact. Many of de Gaulle's first recruits were soldiers and sailors. The one eminent politician to offer his services was Pierre Cot, a popular front minister with a defensible record on rearmament. However, de Gaulle turned him down for he preferred to be free of politicians. Catholic language supplied, as it did to the Vichy reformers, a way of saying that politics had been dirty and needed a remedy. De Gaulle's original concept of union was non-political — a stillness of factions in which sincere people could purge their confusion. The Gaullist logic that made enemies of all who were not enlisted friends was disconcerting; but so, conversely, were the scruples and complaints of the dissidents.

Keywords:   de Gaulle, politics, Gaullist logic, Catholic language, union

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