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Conquered EnglandKingship, Succession, and Tenure 1066-1166$
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George Garnett

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198207931

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207931.001.0001

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The King as an Anomaly

The King as an Anomaly

Chapter:
(p.45) II The King as an Anomaly
Source:
Conquered England
Author(s):

George Garnett (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207931.003.0002

This chapter explores in more detail the transformation in tenure consequent on William's conquest. It concentrates on the writings of Eadmer of Canterbury who revealed a particularly acute understanding of the tenurial changes which the Conquest had entailed. He saw that prelates as well as laymen held their lands of the king in a new way — a way which he regarded as sacrilegious. This novel personal and tenurial bond was created by homage. The chapter proceeds to explore these changes more broadly by reference to Domesday Book, charters, and writs, and most notably Henry I's coronation charter. It argues that the king's position as the only lord who was not in turn a tenant is the most potent and neglected consequence of the Conquest.

Keywords:   Eadmer, Domesday Book, charters, writs, Henry I, Henry I's coronation charter, lord, tenant, homage, king

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