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English Medieval BooksThe Reading Abbey Collections from Foundation to Dispersal$
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Alan Coates

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198207566

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207566.001.0001

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Comparison between the Twelfth–century Collections of Reading Abbey and those of Other Houses

Comparison between the Twelfth–century Collections of Reading Abbey and those of Other Houses

Chapter:
(p.37) 3 Comparison between the Twelfth–century Collections of Reading Abbey and those of Other Houses
Source:
English Medieval Books
Author(s):

Alan Coates

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207566.003.0004

Fifty-eight predominantly twelfth-century manuscripts that have a known or suspected Reading provenance survive. The principal contents fall into five main categories: glossed books of the Bible, patristic works, theological treatises, history and chronicles, and service books. There is also some hagiography and one volume of poetry, but none of the classical or grammatical works from the book list has survived. The Reading Abbey's list seems to be particularly strong in patristics: this impression is no doubt partly because the entries frequently contain references to more than one text in a given volume. This chapter compares the contents of the Fingall Cartulary list and the lists from Durham and Rochester. Two late twelfth-century book lists from Benedictine houses, Burton-on-Trent and Whitby, are also compared. The Durham and Rochester lists are strong in both classics and medicine. Reading and Durham both have copies of the lives of saints such as Cuthbert, Brendan, and Brigid.

Keywords:   Reading Abbey, twelfth-century manuscripts, Bible, patristics, chronicles, theological treatises, hagiography, Durham, Rochester, Benedictine houses

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