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‘A Nation of Beggars’?Priests, People, and Politics in Famine Ireland, 1846–1852$
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Donal A. Kerr

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198207375

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207375.001.0001

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Cardinal’s Hat or Archbishop’s Gauntlet? The ‘Papal Aggression’: The Ecclesiastical Titles Act and Ireland

Cardinal’s Hat or Archbishop’s Gauntlet? The ‘Papal Aggression’: The Ecclesiastical Titles Act and Ireland

Chapter:
(p.241) 8 Cardinal’s Hat or Archbishop’s Gauntlet? The ‘Papal Aggression’: The Ecclesiastical Titles Act and Ireland
Source:
‘A Nation of Beggars’?
Author(s):

DONAL A. KERR

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207375.003.0008

Before Roman negotiations got under way, and while the paper war on the colleges was still raging, a new development occurred in England that was to have profound repercussions for the situation in Ireland up to the end of Russell’s administration. The year and a half from the calling of the synod of Thurles to the resignation of the government in February 1852 witnessed an unexpected but bitter and prolonged dispute between the Whig government and the Catholic Church. During this period, the Whigs' religious policies appeared to become less liberal, while the Catholic Church in Britain and Ireland moved towards Ultramontanism. The public dispute between the Irish bishops on the colleges, which had continued after the closure of the synod, saw appeals and counter-appeals to Rome. It was suddenly overshadowed by an event that had little to do with Ireland and her affairs: ‘the papal aggression’.

Keywords:   England, John Russell, Catholic Church, Whig government, Britain, Ultramontanism

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