Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Susan Wood

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198206972

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206972.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 February 2020

Legislation and reforming opinion

Legislation and reforming opinion

Chapter:
(p.789) 22 Legislation and reforming opinion
Source:
The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West
Author(s):

Susan Wood

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206972.003.0023

The chief external constraint on property-right in churches, from the first, was the tenuous but never defunct authority of bishops over their founding, manning, and functioning (with the spasmodic support of rulers). The bishops' conception of this authority and its proper exercise, along with the responsiveness to it of clergy, monks, and laity, depended on the changing background of ideas and the development of law and opinion. This chapter examines the articulate opinions of leading churchmen or canonists, usually formed or expressed at councils, regarding the practical workings of proprietary churches under customary law. In Francia, the mid-eighth-century reforms as a whole may have been seen as a threat, not only by those enjoying the fruits of secularization, but also by founders and lords of lesser churches and monasteries.

Keywords:   proprietary church, property-right, property, legislation, customary law, lay lordship, canon law, legal opinions

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .