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The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West$
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Susan Wood

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198206972

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206972.001.0001

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Great churches as lords of monasteries

Great churches as lords of monasteries

Chapter:
(p.413) 13 Great churches as lords of monasteries
Source:
The Proprietary Church in the Medieval West
Author(s):

Susan Wood

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206972.003.0014

From Carolingian times to the 12th century, countless lesser monasteries and many substantial ones came into the lordship of greater monasteries or of bishoprics, or were founded as theirs from the start; a lordship not basically different from that of lay lords, but differing often in its origin and in some of the interests and ideas that governed its exercise. By the 11th century, dependent monasteries were counted in dozens among the so-called possessions of great monasteries. Earlier, however, when monasteries sent out colonies or took lesser monasteries under their wing, it did not have to be in a legal sense that one ‘belonged’ to the other. Even when an abbot or community built and endowed a daughter house, it might not at first be treated or regarded as property, nor later securely so. This chapter looks at great churches as lords of monasteries in France, Burgundy, Lotharingia, and Germany.

Keywords:   monasteries, proprietary church, lordship, property, bishoprics, great churches, Germany, France

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