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Benjamin Collins and the Provincial Newspaper Trade in the Eighteenth Century$
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C. Y. Ferdinand

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198206521

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206521.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.209) Conclusion
Source:
Benjamin Collins and the Provincial Newspaper Trade in the Eighteenth Century
Author(s):

C. Y. Ferdinand

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206521.003.0008

This section concludes that this discussion of the eighteenth-century English newspaper trade, which starts from a close study of the Salisbury Journal and the Hampshire Chronicle, is intended as a contribution to the studies made by James E. Tierney, Jeremy Black, and Cranfield and Wiles to investigate the wider history of the newspaper trade in England. It states that evidence accumulated from reading fifty years' production of the Salisbury Journal has provided a basis for discussion of the place it held in the history not only of the newspaper trade but of the increasingly interdependent book trade. It notes that editorial comment, imprints, and lists of news agencies compiled from the paper itself have helped to re-create the administrative structure of the paper.

Keywords:   English newspaper trade, Salisbury Journal, Hampshire Chronicle, James E. Tierney, Jeremy Black, Cranfield and Wiles, book trade

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