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Churchill$
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Robert Blake and Wm. Roger Louis

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198206262

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206262.001.0001

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Churchill and France

Churchill and France

Chapter:
(p.41) 3 Churchill and France
Source:
Churchill
Author(s):

Douglas Johnson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206262.003.0004

On November 11, 1944, Winston Churchill made a speech in Paris, France. It was a moving speech and an emotional occasion: the commemoration of the armistice of the First World War whilst the Second World War continued. Perhaps significant in Churchill's relations with France throughout his long career, whilst the sentiments expressed and the emotions felt were real enough, behind them lay many complexities. In 1944 much bitterness was still present. Britain's failure to recognize Charles de Gaulle's administration as the official government of France until October 23, 1944 and the exclusion of France from a number of international conferences had made relations difficult. There was a personal element of considerable importance in Anglo-French relations during that time. This chapter looks at certain specific moments in Anglo-French relations that determined Churchill's attitude towards France.

Keywords:   Winston Churchill, Britain, France, Anglo-French relations, Charles de Gaulle, First World War, Second World War

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