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Religious Change in Europe 1650–1914Essays for John McManners$
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Nigel Aston

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205968

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205968.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 October 2019

Colonial Church Establishment in the Aftermath of the Colenso Controversy

Colonial Church Establishment in the Aftermath of the Colenso Controversy

Chapter:
(p.345) 17 Colonial Church Establishment in the Aftermath of the Colenso Controversy
Source:
Religious Change in Europe 1650–1914
Author(s):

Peter Hinchliff

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205968.003.0018

John William Colenso, first bishop of Natal in southern Mrica, became embroiled in a dispute concerning the precise legal and constitutional position of the established Church of England in the British colonies. The Elizabethan Act of Supremacy had asserted that the queen, as supreme governor of the Church of England, possessed jurisdiction over all persons and all causes ecclesiastical as well as temporal (or secular) throughout all her dominions. This chapter notes that the Act did not say that the queen was supreme head of all religion in all her dominions. She was supreme governor of the Church of England. That supremacy extended over persons and over lawsuits (causes).

Keywords:   Church of England, British colonies, John William Colenso, Elizabethan Act of Supremacy, lawsuits, petition

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