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Religious Change in Europe 1650–1914Essays for John McManners$
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Nigel Aston

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205968

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205968.001.0001

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A Not Exclusive Truth: An Early Nineteenth-Century Pastoral Theology and Erasmus

A Not Exclusive Truth: An Early Nineteenth-Century Pastoral Theology and Erasmus

Chapter:
(p.275) 13 A Not Exclusive Truth: An Early Nineteenth-Century Pastoral Theology and Erasmus
Source:
Religious Change in Europe 1650–1914
Author(s):

Bruce Mansfield

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205968.003.0014

Joseph Widmer appears to belong to the Catholic reaction of the post-Napoleonic era. His views have been called ‘ultramontane’. In the political and religious struggles of his native land, Lucerne, his associations were with the traditionalists, the opponents of the Enlightenment, the defenders of the Church, its independence, and even its dominance. At least at first glance he seems to have stood with those who, since the 16th century, had been severe critics of Erasmus, for the very openness of works like the Paraclesis and his corrosive effect generally on the structures and standing of the Church. There is a puzzle in the conjuncture of Erasmus and Widmer; its solution requires a closer look at Widmer and his world and a study of his text, its intellectual debts and associations and its place in the history of Erasmus interpretations.

Keywords:   Joseph Widmer, Erasmus, post-Napoleonic era, ultramontane, Enlightenment, Catholic reaction

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