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The Pursuit of Power in Modern Japan 1825–1995$
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Chushichi Tsuzuki

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205890

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205890.001.0001

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The End of Showa and the End of the Bubble Economy

The End of Showa and the End of the Bubble Economy

Chapter:
(p.444) 21 The End of Showa and the End of the Bubble Economy
Source:
The Pursuit of Power in Modern Japan 1825–1995
Author(s):

CHUSHICHI TSUZUKI

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205890.003.0022

This chapter starts by discussing the end of the Showa era. It describes the idea of Showa, and the emperor and the war. The emperor's funeral and the bubble economy are also explained. There is certainly no direct connection between the end of the Showa era in 1989 and the bubble economy that took the form of an ‘abnormal’ rise in share- and land prices in the period 1987–90. Yet these two incidents can be presented as the two sides of the same coin. The collapse of the LDP hegemony is illustrated. Japan and the Japanese found themselves in disarray, faced with the stark realities underlying their inflated image of themselves. Japan was remade by the Americans after 1945 and established as a junior partner on security matters after 1951. The transformation of post-war Japan has not altered the quality of man. In general, the identity-crisis itself is rooted deep in Japanese history.

Keywords:   Showa, bubble economy, LDP hegemony, Japan, war, emperor, Japanese history

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