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The Stations of the SunA History of the Ritual Year in Britain$
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Ronald Hutton

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205708

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205708.001.0001

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Gunpowder Treason

Gunpowder Treason

Chapter:
(p.393) 35 Gunpowder Treason
Source:
The Stations of the Sun
Author(s):

Ronald Hutton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205708.003.0039

When the Restoration occurred, and a full cycle of ecclesiastical and statutory festivals was reinstalled, the popularity of ‘Gunpowder Treason Day’ continued unabated. It was still the most widely celebrated of anniversaries in politics, far surpassing the new annual festivity of Restoration Day. Bells were rung upon it in 55 per cent of the parishes that have left accessible accounts from the reign of Charles II. They included a large number of villages in every part of the realm. During the growth of popular feeling against Catholicism during the 1670s, Londoners developed the tradition of parading effigies of the Pope and burning them at Temple Bar, a piece of street theatre that was enacted every year from the conversion of the royal heir to the faith of Rome in 1673 to the collapse of public opposition to his succession in 1682.

Keywords:   Restoration, festivals, Gunpowder Treason Day, anniversaries, politics, Catholicism, effigies, Pope, Rome

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