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The Stations of the SunA History of the Ritual Year in Britain$
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Ronald Hutton

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205708

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205708.001.0001

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First Fruits

First Fruits

Chapter:
(p.327) 32 First Fruits
Source:
The Stations of the Sun
Author(s):

Ronald Hutton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205708.003.0032

The last of the cycle of four feasts mentioned in Tochmarc Emire was ‘Bron Trogain, earth's sorrowing in autumn’. ‘Bron’ means ‘wrath’, but there seems to be no agreement upon the identity of Trogain, to whom this anger is credited. Uniquely, the feast is referred to in the Tochmarc by a name other than that by which it is known in most other sources, Lughnasadh, the festival of the god Lugh, one of the most prominent deities in the early medieval literature of Ireland. This point matters in this chapter because the same generations of scholars who believed in pan-Celtic deities also tended to accept the concept of pan-Celtic festivals. This notion helped to inspire the finest book ever written about a traditional Irish feast, Máire MacNeill's study of Lughnasadh, which combined medieval literature with folklore surveys from all over the British Isles.

Keywords:   feasts, Tochmarc Emire, Bron Trogain, Lughnasadh, Lugh, literature, Ireland, Máire MacNeill, folklore, British Isles

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