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The Stations of the SunA History of the Ritual Year in Britain$
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Ronald Hutton

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205708

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205708.001.0001

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Royal Oak

Royal Oak

Chapter:
(p.288) 27 Royal Oak
Source:
The Stations of the Sun
Author(s):

Ronald Hutton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205708.003.0027

Owing to accidents of fortune, anniversaries in politics had first appeared in the winter, as will be described. In 1660, however, one was installed in May, to provide an annual thanksgiving for the restoration of the monarchy after 11 years of republican rule. This was coupled with a day of fasting and mourning upon January 30, the anniversary of the execution of Charles I. The May date, the twenty-ninth, was not that of the formal proclamation of the Restoration, which had occurred three weeks earlier, but of the ‘completion’ of the process by Charles II's formal entry into London. Thus two royal anniversaries, which had come, since the reign of Queen Elizabeth, to be celebrated as a matter of course, would as long as Charles lived be neatly taken up with rites of passage out of the traumas of the Interregnum.

Keywords:   anniversaries, politics, thanksgiving, restoration, monarchy, Charles I, Charles II, London, Queen Elizabeth, Interregnum

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