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The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The Nineteenth Century$
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Andrew Porter

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205654

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205654.001.0001

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British Migration and the Peopling of the Empire

British Migration and the Peopling of the Empire

Chapter:
(p.75) 4 British Migration and the Peopling of the Empire
Source:
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume III: The Nineteenth Century
Author(s):

Marjory Harper

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205654.003.0004

Nineteenth century migration was the product of an extremely complex web of influences, which created a restless, rootless population and also provided an outlet for it in an expanding world within and beyond the British Empire. Emigration has been a subject of public and political debate since at least the mid-eighteenth century. The assisted migration was controversial. Voluntary migration — unimpeded by the regulations of governments and societies — shows even more clearly the influence of migrants' circumstances and ambitions on the volume, direction, and character of the exodus. By the close of the nineteenth century, migration had been woven inextricably into the fabric of British life and public debate, and had made a significant demographic and cultural impact on both donor and receiver societies.

Keywords:   migration, public debate, population, voluntary migration, assisted migration, migrants, emigration

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