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The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume IV: The Twentieth Century$
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Judith Brown and Wm Roger Louis

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205647

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205647.001.0001

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Ireland and the Empire-Commonwealth, 1900–1948

Ireland and the Empire-Commonwealth, 1900–1948

Chapter:
(p.138) 6 Ireland and the Empire-Commonwealth, 1900–1948
Source:
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume IV: The Twentieth Century
Author(s):

DEIRDRE MCMAHON

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205647.003.0006

This chapter describes the significance of Ireland in the unfolding history of the British Empire and Commonwealth. The new, more self-assertive generation of nationalists was watched with some apprehension by the Roman Catholic Church. The Church supported the demand for Home Rule but opposed more revolutionary forms of nationalism, fearing not just the disorder and chaos of revolution but also the rise of the anticlericalism it had so successfully avoided. The final contours of Home Rule were still unclear by the time it was finally enacted on 18 September 1914. The conflicting ideas in the evolution of an Irish settlement were symbolized by two remarkable men, Erskine Childers and Lionel Curtis. The signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty had profound repercussions in the wider Imperial sphere.

Keywords:   Ireland, British Empire, Commonwealth, Roman Catholic Church, Home Rule, Erskine Childers, Lionel Curtis, Anglo-Irish Treaty

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