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Death and the PrinceMemorial Preaching Before 1350$
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D. L. d'Avray

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203964

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203964.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.222) Conclusion
Source:
Death and the Prince
Author(s):

D. L. D’ AVRAY

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203964.003.0007

The evidence of memorial preaching begins to accumulate in the central medieval period, but it is only from the fourteenth century that we have a substantial number of sermons in memory of princes. Princes and kings from the Angevin dynasty of Naples are forced on the historian's attention by the weight of surviving evidence. The combination of this-worldly and other-worldly ideology is represented to the recipient by the balance of emphasis in the sermons themselves. Achievements are not just briefly touched on at the start of the sermon, nor is the afterlife just touched on the end; this balance of emphasis reflects the political society around the sermons, which gives a representational likeness of a kingship oriented both to secular business and to the last things. This final conclusion might be half-seriously described as an application of the ‘weak Zeitgist principle’.

Keywords:   memorial preaching, sermons, princes, kings, Angevin dynasty, afterlife, kingship, Zeitgist principle, political society

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