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The RestorationA Political and Religious History of England and Wales, 1658–1667$
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Ronald Hutton

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203926

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203926.001.0001

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The Road to Restoration

The Road to Restoration

Chapter:
(p.85) 4 The Road to Restoration
Source:
The Restoration
Author(s):

Ronald Hutton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203926.003.0006

Charles II and his ministers had spent the winter in their customary uncomfortable fashion, receiving information, laying plots, and evading creditors. The news of the October coup had brought the King back to Brussels and Viscount Mordaunt to London, while some of the exiles came up with the idea that Charles should marry Lambert's daughter. Monck, they generally took at face value as the purged Parliament's champion, and its return was a heavy blow, compounded for Mordaunt by the personal problem that the English royalists were inclined to blame him for the disaster of August and disinclined to follow him any longer. Nevertheless, another network of local leaders designed to promote the King's interests had been formed by early February, only for the exiles to receive the dreary news that Monck seemed to be crushing the City to secure the Commonwealthsmen in power. Then came in quick succession the almost incredible tidings of the general's change of tactics and of the readmission. There began to dawn upon the exiled royalists the wonderful possibility of a peaceful restoration, and upon the royalist conspirators in England the appalling possibility that this would take place without their aid.

Keywords:   Charles II, George Monck, Parliament, restoration, exile, royalists, October coup

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