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The RestorationA Political and Religious History of England and Wales, 1658–1667$
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Ronald Hutton

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203926

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203926.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.181) 3 Conclusions
Source:
The Restoration
Author(s):

Ronald Hutton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203926.003.0010

This chapter addresses the following questions: Whose victory did the Restoration Settlements represent? Who had effectively won in 1662? The reply most often given in recent years is that the King did, and that the Restoration represented the ultimate triumph of the royalist cause. The legal issue which had provoked the Great Civil War, the question of who controlled the militia, had been decided as Charles I had wished. None of the constitutional checks which the parliamentarians had sought to impose upon the monarchy from 1642 till 1660 had taken hold, and now the very notion of resisting the Crown was made the grounds for loss of office. According to this school of thought, the monarchy emerged from the Interregnum stronger than before, and only the Glorious Revolution prevented it from growing stronger still.

Keywords:   Restoration Settlements, royalists, monarchy, Charles I

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