Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Public and Private Ownership of British Industry 1820–1990$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Foreman-Peck and Robert Millward

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203599

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203599.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2019

The Political Response to Market Failure: Railways and Other National Communications Networks 1870–1914

The Political Response to Market Failure: Railways and Other National Communications Networks 1870–1914

Chapter:
(p.66) 3 The Political Response to Market Failure: Railways and Other National Communications Networks 1870–1914
Source:
Public and Private Ownership of British Industry 1820–1990
Author(s):

James Foreman-Peck

Robert Millward

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203599.003.0003

Judged by productivity growth, capital costs, and continuing controversies over freight rates, the railway policy in Britain after 1870 proved to be none too effective. The need for a policy on telephone technology fell between telegraphs and railways for, when state policy became a live issue, the Treasury was very conscious of the expense of a subsidised telegraph system. British telephony therefore failed to take full advantage of the technology, and this had adverse effects for the industry as a whole. The other side of the coin was a large, effective, and integrated telegraph network, albeit one that was subsidised by postal users. The long-established state-owned Post Office offered a model for some would-be reformers of the transport and communication industries. However, state industry prestige was not universally high in the 1860s.

Keywords:   productivity growth, capital costs, freight rates, railway policy, telephone policy, telegraphs, state policy, Post Office, communication industries, Britain

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .