Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Entrepreneurial Politics in Mid-Victorian Britain$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

G. R. Searle

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203575

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203575.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 June 2019

The Development of Commercial Politics, 1850–1870

The Development of Commercial Politics, 1850–1870

Chapter:
(p.166) 5 The Development of Commercial Politics, 1850–1870
Source:
Entrepreneurial Politics in Mid-Victorian Britain
Author(s):

G. R. Searle

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203575.003.0006

In 1860, many of the provincial Chambers of Commerce in Britain decided to form a federation in order to increase the influence of businessmen on Parliament and the government. With the emergence of the Association of Chambers of Commerce (ACC), a new era in entrepreneurial politics had begun. From modest beginnings, the association quickly made its mark on political life, since despite the patchiness of its geographical spread, it had affiliated to it the Chambers of most of the important industrial and commercial areas, particularly in Yorkshire and the Midlands. ACC saw its own role as being ‘a most useful medium of communication between the commercial, manufacturing and trading classes and the government of this country’. This chapter explores the development of commercial politics in Britain from 1850 to 1870, the decimalization issue, the dispute between businessmen and the legal profession, the issue of patents, and limited liability.

Keywords:   Britain, Association of Chambers of Commerce, entrepreneurial politics, Chambers of Commerce, businessmen, decimalization, legal profession, patents, limited liability, commercial politics

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .