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Funerals, Politics, and Memory in Modern France, 1789–1996$
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Avner Ben-Amos

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198203285

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203285.001.0001

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Funerals of Soldiers and Colonizers

Funerals of Soldiers and Colonizers

Chapter:
(p.204) 7 Funerals of Soldiers and Colonizers
Source:
Funerals, Politics, and Memory in Modern France, 1789–1996
Author(s):

Avner Ben-Amos

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198203285.003.0008

Until around 1900, most of the military state funerals in France were given, accordingly, to republican high ranking army officers who had distinguished themselves in the 1870 war, some of whom served afterwards as governors of Paris. All of the funerals of the republican war heroes, with the exception of Denfert-Rochereau, were Catholic ceremonies, celebrated with full military pomp at the Invalides, culminating there in the church of Saint-Louis. The republican speakers in these ceremonies tended to concentrate on the patriotism and the military exploits of the dead heroes, and to mention their republicanism only in passing, thus giving the ceremony a national character. This chapter looks at the state funerals of French soldiers and colonizers, including revolutionary heroes such as Marceau, Lazare Carnot, La Tour d'Auvergne, Jean Baudin, and Rouget de Lisle, and colonizers like Admiral Courbet, Paul Bert, and Marshal Lyautey. It discusses the question of war commemoration after the 1870 war. The dual transfer of the remains of Léon Gambetta and of an Unknown Soldier to the Panthéon is also considered.

Keywords:   France, state funerals, French soldiers, army officers, colonizers, war heroes, Invalides, Léon Gambetta, Unknown Soldier, Panthéon

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