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War and Economy in the Third Reich$
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R. J. Overy

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202905

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202905.001.0001

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Germany, ‘Domestic Crisis’, and War in 1939

Germany, ‘Domestic Crisis’, and War in 1939

Chapter:
(p.205) 7 Germany, ‘Domestic Crisis’, and War in 1939
Source:
War and Economy in the Third Reich
Author(s):

R. J. Overy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202905.003.0008

Tim Mason has argued that there is a half-way house, that Adolf Hitler's declared intentions and their flawed realisation are evidence of a dialectical relationship between actors and historical context which gives primacy to neither. There is a widely held explanation for the origins of World War II, and indeed this has been so since these ideas were first formulated some twenty years ago. In the complex politics of the Third Reich two key elements have been observed: first, the effort to push through a programme of rearmament in a short period of time to satisfy the demands of the military elites, the party hawks, secondly, the desire that rearmament should not be compromised by provoking the masses into political opposition by reducing living standards and courting economic crisis.

Keywords:   Tim Mason, Adolf Hitler, World War II, Third Reich, rearmament, party hawks, economic crisis

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