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War and Economy in the Third Reich$
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R. J. Overy

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202905

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202905.001.0001

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German Multi-Nationals and the Nazi State in Occupied Europe

German Multi-Nationals and the Nazi State in Occupied Europe

Chapter:
(p.315) 10 German Multi-Nationals and the Nazi State in Occupied Europe
Source:
War and Economy in the Third Reich
Author(s):

R. J. Overy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202905.003.0011

During World War II the relationship between German industry and industry elsewhere in Europe was transformed. By 1941 Germany was the master of large parts of the industrialized continent. German leaders sought to co-ordinate the industrial resources of the conquered and dependent areas with the long-term economic interests of the Reich. The opportunities opened up by conquest to extend German multi-nationalism were substantial, though much of the new multi-national activity was promoted through state ownership and was governed in the main by political considerations and the needs of war. The relationship between government and multi-national development is therefore of central importance. Much of the new multi-national activity did not spring in the main from commercial motive. The state sought to suppress purely economic motives and to substitute some rough notion of ‘racial political’ priority when supervising industrial acquisitions or controlling existing German subsidiaries.

Keywords:   Germany, industry, industrial resources, Europe, Reich, multi-nationalism, acquisitions, subsidiaries

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