Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The End of an ÉliteThe French Bishops and the Coming of the Revolution 1786-1790$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Nigel Aston

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202844

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202844.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 November 2019

The bishops and the Civil Constitution, 1790

The bishops and the Civil Constitution, 1790

Chapter:
(p.231) 12 The bishops and the Civil Constitution, 1790
Source:
The End of an Élite
Author(s):

Nigel Aston

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202844.003.0013

Those bishops who stayed in the Chamber after 1790 participated, as much as they felt able, in all aspects of creating the new Constitution. Prelates clung to their reformist outlooks and optimistically tried to view the proposals of the National Assembly in the most favourable light: a chance to rationalise features of Church life heavily criticised in the last decades of the ancien régime. Thus, Archbishop Jean de Boisgelin could agree with Jean-Baptiste Treilhard that the object of all ecclesiastical reforms was to restore the Church to its primitive state, but their ideas diverged abruptly on the means of achieving that end. Reform was one thing, turning the Church into a department of State quite another as far as the bishops were concerned. This chapter further discusses the Civil Constitution of the Clergy, the summoning of a National Council, and Bonal of Clermont.

Keywords:   bishops, prelates, National Assembly, ancien régime, Jean de Boisgelin, Jean-Baptiste Treilhard, ecclesiastical reforms, Civil Constitution, National Council, Bonal of Clermont

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .