Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Calvinists and LibertinesConfession and Community in Utrecht 1578-1620$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Benjamin J. Kaplan

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202837

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202837.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 24 August 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Calvinists and Libertines
Author(s):

Benjamin J. Kaplan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202837.003.0001

This introductory chapter begins with a discussion of the Calvinist–Libertine conflict, which revolved around two points: the character of the Dutch Reformed Church as a religious community and the relation between that church and the rest of Dutch society. To oversimplify a bit, one can say that the Calvinists prevailed on the first point, the Libertines on the second. The Dutch Reformed Church became a thoroughly Calvinist, thoroughly disciplined entity; Dutch society as a whole did not. The chapter then sets out the purpose of this book, which is to present a more comprehensive, integrated interpretation of the Calvinist–Libertine conflict in the Netherlands; and it does so by placing the conflict in an international context. Rather than viewing it as an isolated phenomenon unique to the Dutch, as has so often been done, it argues that it was in fact a local manifestation of a much broader struggle between the champions and opponents of confessionalism. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.

Keywords:   Calvinism, Libertines, Calvinist–Libertine conflict, Dutch Reformation, confessionalism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .