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Calvinists and LibertinesConfession and Community in Utrecht 1578-1620$
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Benjamin J. Kaplan

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202837

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202837.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.297) Conclusion
Source:
Calvinists and Libertines
Author(s):

Benjamin J. Kaplan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202837.003.0010

This chapter summarizes the preceding discusses and presents some concluding thoughts from the author. The final result of the Dutch Reformation was that peculiar combination of severe Calvinism and religious freedom that characterized the Dutch Republic. Within the Dutch Reformed Church, confessionalism triumphed; in Dutch society as a whole, confessionalization failed. Indeed, one can speak of a trade-off between the two. The more confessional the church became, the less compatible it was with the broader social vision of Dutch regents. Ironically, had Dutch Calvinists been more willing to dilute their confessionalism, they might eventually have come closer to realizing their Dutch New Israel. For in so doing they would certainly have gained more support than they did, both from the regents and from the majority of ordinary lay folk.

Keywords:   Calvinist–Libertine conflict, Libertines, Calvinists, Dutch Reformation, religious freedom, confessionalism

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