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Conservative CenturyThe Conservative Party since 1900$
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Anthony Seldon and Stuart Ball

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202387

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202387.001.0001

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The Party in Scotland

The Party in Scotland

Chapter:
(p.671) 18 The Party in Scotland
Source:
Conservative Century
Author(s):

JAMES KELLAS

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202387.003.0018

This chapter examines the cause of the decline of Conservative support in Scotland. It explains that the Scottish Conservative organization was more elitist and out-dated than that below the border, and suffered from a dearth of activists. The chapter explains that the party has failed to establish a sufficiently ‘Scottish’ identity in a period of rising resentment of English hegemony, of which increased support for the Scottish Nationalists was only the most marked manifestation. It argues that despite considerable belated attempts to adapt to the ‘Scottish factor’, the party in Scotland is still the preserve of the small private-sector-oriented section of proportionately smaller middle class. The chapter explains that the Scottish experience shows what might have happened elsewhere in the mainland if the Conservative Party had been similarly unable to retain the support of working-class men and women in a changing society and culture.

Keywords:   Conservative Party, Scotland, Scottish Nationalists, Scottish factor, Scottish identity, working class

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