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Bound for AmericaThe Transportation of British Convicts to the Colonies, 1718-1775$
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A. Roger Ekirch

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202110

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202110.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2019

Coming Home

Coming Home

Chapter:
(p.194) 7 Coming Home
Source:
Bound for America
Author(s):

A. Roger Ekirch

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202110.003.0009

Despite harsh punishments, during the 18th century a large number of convicts ran away from their masters in America without serving their time in employment as servants, and this became very common practice. Newspapers in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania were often published with notices of runaway convicts urging their capture. From the period 1746 to 1775 the Maryland Gazette published notices of around 993 separate Maryland convicts, an average of thirty-three runaways per year. A large portion of these runaways were male, out of 1401 Maryland and Virginia runaways during the mid-18th century nearly 95% were men and boys. Males comprised around 80% of all convicts and their masters were more likely to advertise for their male servants to be captured due to their greater value, while female servants were less willing to choose the runaway option.

Keywords:   runaways, Maryland Gazette, punishment, male servants, female servants

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