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Liberty and Locality – Parliament, Permissive Legislation, and Ratepayers' Democracies in the Nineteenth Century | Oxford Scholarship Online
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Liberty and Locality: Parliament, Permissive Legislation, and Ratepayers' Democracies in the Nineteenth Century

John Prest

Abstract

This is a study of local government and permissive legislation in 19th-century Britain. It argues that permissive legislation facilitated local initiative and debate, and that local initiatives were often more effective than national legislation. In the 18th century, every locality which wished to improve or police its streets had to obtain its own private Act of Parliament. By the 19th century, when the construction of a habitable urban environment had become a matter of urgency, Parliament had recourse to ‘permissive’ or ‘adoptive’ legislation, which the localities were free to adopt, or not ... More

Keywords: local government, permissive legislation, 19th-century Britain, local initiative, Parliament

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 1990 Print ISBN-13: 9780198201755
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011 DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201755.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

John Prest, author
Balliol College, Oxford

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Contents

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I Parliament and the Localities

II The Isle of Wight

III Huddersfield and District

IV Local and Central Government

End Matter