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Lord Grey 1764–1845$
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E. A. Smith

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780198201632

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201632.001.0001

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Whigs out of Place, 1810–1830

Whigs out of Place, 1810–1830

Chapter:
(p.190) 5 Whigs out of Place, 1810–1830
Source:
Lord Grey 1764–1845
Author(s):

E. A. Smith

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201632.003.0006

This chapter discusses the failed attempts of Grey and Grenville to bring the Whig Party into office. George III relapsed into mental illness in the autumn of 1810. Grey still hoped that the Prince of Wales would honour his old connections with the Whigs and that he would use his prerogative as Regent to bring them into office, as they had hoped in 1788. Before that could happen, however, the Regency had to be established and the question of procedure immediately presented itself. The Whig leaders had to consider how to advise the Prince to reply to the Regency resolutions agreed by the Parliament; however, they had some difficulty in reconciling their opinions. The Regency Bill was formally assented to on 5 February and the Prince was sworn in as Regent on the 6th. Perceval's government was confirmed in office, and the Whigs remained in opposition.

Keywords:   Grey, Grenville, Whig Party, George III, Prince of Wales, Regency, Regency Bill, Perceval

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