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Women and the Labour Movement in Scotland 1850–1914$
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Eleanor Gordon

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198201434

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201434.001.0001

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Women and Working-Class Politics, 1900–1914

Women and Working-Class Politics, 1900–1914

Chapter:
(p.261) 7. Women and Working-Class Politics, 1900–1914
Source:
Women and the Labour Movement in Scotland 1850–1914
Author(s):

Eleanor Gordon

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201434.003.0008

This chapter deals with Scottish politics between 1900 and 1914 and its impact on working-class women. The Labour Party was even less successful in Scotland than in other parts of the country. In the second decade of the 20th century there was a flowering of socialist and labour organizations, which spearheaded a number of campaigns attracting widespread popular support for the Labour Party among the working class. The issues around which these campaigns were conducted ranged from the housing question and unemployment to school meals and the medical inspection of school children. The largest of the working-class women's organizations, the SCWG, was not only aimed at housewives, but more particularly at the wives of better-off sections of the working class.

Keywords:   Scottish politics, working-class women, labour party, SCWG, labour organizations

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