Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Faerie Queene and Middle English Romance: The Matter of Just Memory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Andrew King

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198187226

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198187226.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 October 2019

‘The world…runne quite out of square’: Remembering/Dismembering Native Romance and National Identity in Book V

‘The world…runne quite out of square’: Remembering/Dismembering Native Romance and National Identity in Book V

Chapter:
(p.189) 8 ‘The world…runne quite out of square’: Remembering/Dismembering Native Romance and National Identity in Book V
Source:
The Faerie Queene and Middle English Romance: The Matter of Just Memory
Author(s):

Andrew King

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198187226.003.0008

This chapter discusses the connection both Books II and V have with British history and the attempt to derive the national identity through the perception or recollection of history according to a romance, providential narrative. Like Books I and II, Book V needs to be read as part of Spenser's reception of Middle English romance, because like Book II in particular, Book V is deeply concerned with the roles that memory and fantasy play in the interpretation of national experience. In its denial of a providential support for native history, Book V deepens Spenser's response to the tradition of native romance concerned with mythopoiec representations of national history and identity.

Keywords:   British history, national identity, romance, Middle English romance, memory, national history, identity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .