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Henry Howard the Poet Earl of SurreyA Life$
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W. A. Sessions

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198186250

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198186250.001.0001

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The Shame of St Etienne

The Shame of St Etienne

Chapter:
(p.319) 12 The Shame of St Etienne
Source:
Henry Howard the Poet Earl of Surrey
Author(s):

W. A. Sessions

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198186250.003.0013

The battle of St Etienne, a disastrous encounter between the English and French forces, turned into an episode of total dishonour for the young earl, marking the first stage of the Earl of Surrey's downfall. Three contemporary documents detail this episode. However all three documents show Surrey had been quite accurate when he had written that the French garrison and labourers at Fort Outreau suffered from want of food and other supplies. He had also been right to speak up for his men; as one of the documents notes: ‘not a penny in the pockets of the common soldiers, because the English had not been paid for nine months’. Without money, the English army had to eat what had been kept in the king's storehouse, much of it spoiled or rotten. Nevertheless, although the Privy Council sent little and Calais could not send supplies except by ship, Surrey managed to avoid the starvation that threatened the French.

Keywords:   battle, St Etienne, English, French, dishonor, Earl of Surrey, Fort Outreau

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