Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Women Latin PoetsLanguage, Gender, and Authority from Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jane Stevenson

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198185024

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198185024.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 July 2019

Italy: Renaissance Women Scholars

Italy: Renaissance Women Scholars

Chapter:
(p.141) 6 Italy: Renaissance Women Scholars
Source:
Women Latin Poets
Author(s):

Jane Stevenson (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198185024.003.0008

Educated women, writers, poets, and orators, became a feature of the Italian cultural landscape in the 15th century, a phenomenon which was recognized Europe-wide as an aspect of the Italian Renaissance. This chapter examines the extreme variability of women's access to education between one state and another. It discusses the social context of Renaissance humanism, and the barriers it offered to women's participation. Women and scribal publication are considered. The chapter includes separate sections on women and the universities, particularly the medical school of Salerno and the law school of Bologna, particularly Novella d'Andrea; women and humanism, Latin as an aspect of demonstrating fitness to rule and woman as Latin orators; the Nogarola family and its connections among male and female Latinists in the Veneto, particularly Isotta Nogarola; Costanza Varano and educated women connected with Urbino; Veronica Gàmbara, the Gonzagas, and the Sforzas. Absence of evidence for Latin verse production in 15th-century convents is pointed out.

Keywords:   Renaissance Italy, women orators, humanism, rise of universities, Salerno, Bologna, Novella d'Andrea, Isotta Nogarola, Costanza Varano, Veronica Gàmbara

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .