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Strange CountryModernity and Nationhood in Irish Writing since 1790$
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Seamus Deane

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198184904

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184904.001.0001

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Phantasmal France, Unreal Ireland Sobering Reflections

Phantasmal France, Unreal Ireland Sobering Reflections

Chapter:
(p.x) (p.1) ONE Phantasmal France, Unreal Ireland Sobering Reflections
Source:
Strange Country
Author(s):

Seamus Deane

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184904.003.0001

This chapter begins with Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France, reading it as a foundational text for a particular description of a contrast and a contest between tradition and modernity that was to become routine in anti-revolutionary writing in Europe. It argues that the Reflections can be understood as a work in which two dominant discourses are deployed: one cultural, the other economic. The first discourse is centred around the events of October 6 1789 and has the French Royal Family, especially Marie Antoinette, as its most fertile emblem. The second is centred around the French finances and the possibility of their recovery through the kinds of fiscal reform that had been initiated by Calonne and Necker, with the new French currency as its central emblem.

Keywords:   Ireland, foundational text, Burke, Castle Rackrent, Edgeworth

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