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Revenge TragedyAeschylus to Armageddon$
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John Kerrigan

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198184515

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184515.001.0001

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. On Aristotle, Violence, and Dialogue: Revenge Tragedy and Contemporary Philosophy

. On Aristotle, Violence, and Dialogue: Revenge Tragedy and Contemporary Philosophy

Chapter:
(p.343) 14. On Aristotle, Violence, and Dialogue: Revenge Tragedy and Contemporary Philosophy
Source:
Revenge Tragedy
Author(s):

John Kerrigan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184515.003.0014

Most modern authors still look into Aristotle's philosophy of morality for reference. It contains ‘moral luck’, a set of morals, traits and decision that shape a person. This determines the drive of a man: it is what pushes him and what sets him back. In contrast to this, the chapter introduces the concept of utilitarianism, in which one is to be devoid of his or her wants, and allow himself to be used as the majority needs him. Life choices, therefore, are mandated not by an individual nut but by a group. Autonomy is the pressing issue of this chapter. Revenge on the other hand, was seen as a reciprocal action, as several works depicted that as one savages the other, one strikes back and so on. New themes of revenge are evolving, as literature moves through history.

Keywords:   Aristotle, moral luck, utilitarianism, choices, reciprocal, evolving

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