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Revenge TragedyAeschylus to Armageddon$
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John Kerrigan

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198184515

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184515.001.0001

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. Revolution, Revenge, and Romantic Tragedy

. Revolution, Revenge, and Romantic Tragedy

Chapter:
(p.242) 10. Revolution, Revenge, and Romantic Tragedy
Source:
Revenge Tragedy
Author(s):

John Kerrigan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184515.003.0010

The summer of 1820 finds Byron working on his first historical drama. It was written with political intention and the threat of a revolution in mind. It contained a different theme for revenge as that seen in the previous chapters, and most French dramas at this time were set on a revolutionary campaign. The actions of the government reflected in literature and theater, and this sparked nationalism among the people. The tragedy in such themes is the victims of war, those innocent countrymen who were caught between two forces so that others could have political gain. Resistance was built from the lost of loved ones and the struggle for freedom. Another point that the chapter brings is the issue of capital punishment and vengeance, where the State is deemed responsible to punish acts of violence and avenge the victims.

Keywords:   political, revolution, campaign, war, resistance, France

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