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Conrad and Women$
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Susan Jones

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198184485

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184485.001.0001

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Preamble

Preamble

Chapter:
(p.1) Preamble
Source:
Conrad and Women
Author(s):

Susan Jones

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184485.003.0001

Joseph Conrad is widely recognised as a writer of sea stories with predominantly masculine themes. This book argues that despite this established reputation, Conrad did not neglect women's themes in all his works. The evidence of his biography, correspondence, and fiction indicates a complex and intriguing relationship between Conrad, the women in his life, his female characters, and readers of his work. He began in the Malay fiction by producing prominent female figures whose position offered an important critique of imperialism, a role that women continued to fulfill in the political works of the middle years, such as Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and Under Western Eyes. He increasingly turned to the issue of gender, female identity, and in relation to romance, how women are invited to conform to its conventionalised gestures and plots.

Keywords:   Joseph Conrad, fiction, women, female characters, Nostromo, The Secret Agent, Under Western Eyes, gender, female identity, romance

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