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Empire, the National, and the Postcolonial, 1890-1920Resistance in Interaction$
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Elleke Boehmer

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198184454

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184454.001.0001

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‘But Transmitters’? 1 : The Interdiscursive Alliance of Aurobindo Ghose and Sister Nivedita

‘But Transmitters’? 1 : The Interdiscursive Alliance of Aurobindo Ghose and Sister Nivedita

Chapter:
(p.79) 3 ‘But Transmitters’?1: The Interdiscursive Alliance of Aurobindo Ghose and Sister Nivedita
Source:
Empire, the National, and the Postcolonial, 1890-1920
Author(s):

ELLEKE BOEHMER

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184454.003.0003

This chapter focuses on plotting the historical and intertextual course of what is known of Aurobindo's and Sister Nivedita's partnership, particularly their cross-nationalist connections text —the traces of their relations, in other words, as these may be detected in their writing as well as in their political work. Thus, the chapter includes an investigation of their own particular disposition towards cross-border or cross-national connections. It then discusses the time right after the concentrated 1902-10 period, wherein Nivedita and Aurobindo contributed to the same like-minded journals on related issues to do with Hindu revival and self-realization, and their intertextual awareness of one another was safeguarded and promoted rather than obstructed by the anonymity they attempted to preserve. It also explains the lines of their cross-referentiality on both religion and politics, indeed of their demonstrable interdiscursivity, thus tying them together, as do the shared if largely silent pages of their collaborative history.

Keywords:   cross-referentiality, interdiscursivity, politics, religion, cross-nationalist connections, India, Aurobindo Ghose, Sister Nivedita, intertextual, Hindu

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