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Aaron HillThe Muses' Projector, 1685-1750$
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Christine Gerrard

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198183884

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198183884.001.0001

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‘Heavenly Clio’: The Making of the Hillarian Circle, 1720–1723

‘Heavenly Clio’: The Making of the Hillarian Circle, 1720–1723

Chapter:
(p.61) 3 ‘Heavenly Clio’: The Making of the Hillarian Circle, 1720–1723
Source:
Aaron Hill
Author(s):

CHRISTINE GERRARD

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198183884.003.0004

This chapter discusses the making of the Hillarian Circle from 1720 to 1723. In 1720, Hill began to invest nearly all his emotional and intellectual energies into the circle of young male and female writers he began to gather round him, a literary coterie dubbed the ‘Hillarian Circle’ after the name bestowed on him by one of his admirers, the novelist and dramatist Eliza Haywood. Hill and Haywood wrote a series of poems in praise of each other's talents. Like much of the coterie verse written by individual members of the Hillarian Circle, these poems evidently circulated in manuscript several years before they eventually found their way into print. Martha Fowke later displaced Haywood as the female luminary of the Hillarian Circle, a poet whose writing mediated between older courtly traditions of coterie writing and the new commercial world of publication to which Haywood belonged.

Keywords:   Hillarian Circle, Eliza Haywood, Martha Fowke, coterie writing, publication

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