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Dickens and the Spirit of the Age$
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Andrew Sanders

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198183549

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198183549.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 October 2019

The Man from Nowhere

The Man from Nowhere

Chapter:
(p.17) 1 The Man from Nowhere
Source:
Dickens and the Spirit of the Age
Author(s):

Andrew Sanders

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198183549.003.0002

Dickens struck most of his first readers as someone which blazed on to the early-Victorian literary firmament like a meteor. The ambitious but still tentative writer who signed himself with the pseudonym ‘Boz’ published his first prose ‘sketch’ in the Monthly Magazine in December 1833. Boz's reputation as a comic observer of London life and London whims was firmly established during the two following years with a stream of further ‘sketches’ published in various magazines, journals, and newspapers. In March 1836, two volumes of the stories he had collected together as Sketches by ‘Boz’ Illustrative of every-day life and every-day people, were released. The very blaze of the talent of the young Boz/Dickens was evidently compelling to his new readers who witnessed the writer of the Sketches triumphantly emerging as the author of the phenomenally successful Pickwick Papers. The reputation of Pickwick Papers was to prove long-lasting and memories of the Pickwick phenomenon in the late-1830s were to remain embedded in the popular imagination, both in fact and fiction.

Keywords:   Charles Dickens, Boz, sketches, Pickwick Papers, writer

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