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British Youth TelevisionCynicism and Enchantment$
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Karen Lury

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780198159704

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159704.001.0001

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Youth and Music on Television

Youth and Music on Television

Chapter:
(p.44) 3 Youth and Music on Television
Source:
British Youth Television
Author(s):

Karen Lury

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159704.003.0003

This chapter examines why popular music is so important for the youth audience. It then relates this question to the difficulties and successes that television has had in representing and sometimes apparently debasing this significant investment. It discusses that popular music on television encourages particular kinds of ‘identity-making’, and the different image–music sequences it produces create spatial and sensual narratives which colonize the youth's imaginations. It describes how the combination of television and popular music produces surprisingly unwieldy images and awkward sequences of music/image/performance. It evaluates why the fit between music and image often so uncomfortable in these and other instances. It discusses how and why bands and/or individual artists appear to ‘sell out’ when they appear on television. If being in a band, or producing music, often presupposes some kind of an audience, it is already a commercial enterprise.

Keywords:   music, television, investment, identity making, imaginations, commercial decision, bands, artists

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