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Winckelmann and the Notion of Aesthetic Education$
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Jeffrey Morrison

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198159124

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159124.001.0001

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Johann Joachim Winckelmann and Roman Ingarden on the Reception of Works of Art

Johann Joachim Winckelmann and Roman Ingarden on the Reception of Works of Art

Chapter:
(p.34) 2 Johann Joachim Winckelmann and Roman Ingarden on the Reception of Works of Art
Source:
Winckelmann and the Notion of Aesthetic Education
Author(s):

Jeffrey Morrison

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159124.003.0002

The consistent popularity of Johann Joachim Winckelmann in Rome was a significant attractor for many visitors. This chapter explains how and why Winckelmann acted as focal point for Italian travellers interested in art. It attempts to determine the key components of Winckelmann's responses to art and how those responses explain why he was able to capture attention and attract patronage during his time in Rome. It also compares and contrasts Winckelman's and Roman Ingarden's interest of aesthetic education and art reception. It then attempts to differentiate Winckelmann's expression of aesthetic experience from that of his pupils.

Keywords:   Johann Joachim Winckelmann, Rome, Italian travellers, art, Roman Ingarden, art reception, aesthetic experience

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