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Winckelmann and the Notion of Aesthetic Education$
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Jeffrey Morrison

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198159124

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159124.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 08 April 2020

Italian Travel in the Eighteenth Century:

Italian Travel in the Eighteenth Century:

The Roman Scene around 1750

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Italian Travel in the Eighteenth Century:
Source:
Winckelmann and the Notion of Aesthetic Education
Author(s):

Jeffrey Morrison

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159124.003.0001

There had been a historical focus upon Rome as a political and religious centre for Western culture. Corresponding attention was paid to its aesthetic appeal; the architecture of the city and its store of art treasures offered the most striking testimony to the city's enduring power and influence. The sudden resurgence of interest and attitude towards Rome may have begun to take place during the period of Johann Joachim Winckelmann's residence in Rome, although it could not wholly be attributed to him. This book is concerned with instances of aesthetic education which took place in Rome. It identifies the reasons for the intense focus of interest on Rome in the 18th century and investigates the specific motivation of members of the Winckelmann circle in visiting Rome.

Keywords:   Rome, Western culture, art, Johann Joachim Winckelmann, aesthetic education

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