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Kafka: Gender, Class, and Race in the Letters and Fictions$
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Elizabeth Boa

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198158196

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198158196.001.0001

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An Intercourse of Ghosts Kafka's Letters to Milena Jesenská

An Intercourse of Ghosts Kafka's Letters to Milena Jesenská

Chapter:
(p.78) 4 An Intercourse of Ghosts Kafka's Letters to Milena Jesenská
Source:
Kafka: Gender, Class, and Race in the Letters and Fictions
Author(s):

Elizabeth Boa

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198158196.003.0004

In 1920, in Merano, Kafka began correspondence with Milena Jesenská when he was on leave from work due to ill health. As the two had already met in the previous year, and since Milena had requested permission for being able to translate his works, this correspondence continued until January 1921. Kafka and Milena met a few times during this correspondence, and Kafka's trust in Milena had become evident, since he entrusted her with the letter that he had not been able to send to his father. Milena passed on Kafka's diaries to Max Brod. This chapter discusses how Milena encountered several different conflicts, and these mainly involved personal relationships. Since Milena came from Czechoslovakia, this chapter explains how national identity serves as an integral element in Milena's will strength.

Keywords:   correspondence, Milena Jesenská, Czechoslovakia, personal relationships, will strength, national identity

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