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Kafka: Gender, Class, and Race in the Letters and Fictions$
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Elizabeth Boa

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198158196

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198158196.001.0001

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Reading Kafka

Reading Kafka

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Reading Kafka
Source:
Kafka: Gender, Class, and Race in the Letters and Fictions
Author(s):

Elizabeth Boa

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198158196.003.0001

Much has been discussed of Franz Kafka; his unorthodox narrative style and his depiction of surreal and foreboding situations, which have enchanted the existentialist reader throughout history. Despite the countless literary and psychological analyses dedicated to his work, the matter of perception is largely static. Most analysis of his works has been dedicated to understanding the protagonist. This chapter, however, states that the analysis should be towards the reader themself, as perception is as important as understanding the social struggles and inner conflicts the protagonist has with himself and the society around them. It summarizes the topics in the succeeding chapters; namely Kafka's literary masterpieces and their relationship to topics such as existentialism, feminism, and the underlying erotic tones that dominated the literary sphere during his time.

Keywords:   Franz Kafka, feminism, existentialism, The Castle

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